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72 Articles match "Books"

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  • Unit testing a ASP.NET WebAPI 2 controller
    1: // GET api/books. 10: var book = _repo.GetBook(id); 11: 12: if (book == null ). 16: 17: return Ok(book); 18: }. 11: var response = actionResult as OkNegotiatedContentResult ; 12: Assert.IsNotNull(response); 13: var books = response.Content; 14: Assert.AreEqual(5, books.Count()); 15: }. 2: public IHttpActionResult Put( int id, Book book). 8: 9: return Ok(_repo.UpdateBook(book)); 10: }. 1: // POST api/books. 2: public IHttpActionResult Post(Book book). 8: var actionResult = controller.Post( new Book. 13: {.
    The Problem Solver - Wednesday, November 13, 2013
  • Unit testing a ASP.NET WebAPI controller
    Testing a simple ApiController that gets data Suppose we have the following ASP.NET WebAPI Controller with two Get methods, the first returns the complete list of books and the second returns the book with the requested ID. 14: 15: // GET api/books. 24: var book = _repo.GetBook(id); 25: 26: if (book == null ). 30: 31: return Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.OK, book); 32: }. The Get() method that returns all books is easy enough to test. There are no dependencies on WebAPI bits, all it does is return a enumeration of books. 8: 9: }.
    The Problem Solver - Sunday, May 12, 2013
  • Unit testing code depending on the ASP.NET #WebApi HttpClient
    In this case the client application contains the following class to load books from the REST WebAPI controller: 1: public class BooksClient. 19: 20: public Book GetBook( int id). 27: 28: public Tuple PostBook(Book book). 30: var response = _httpClient.PostAsJsonAsync(BaseUrl.ToString(), book).Result; This class uses the HttpClient to request the data from the service and extracts the books from the body before returning them. The GetBooks() function gets all books from the REST service. 5: var books = new []. 14: {. Result; 18: }. 21: {.
    The Problem Solver - Monday, May 20, 2013
  • An Effective Introduction to the STL Training
    The companion reference book, Nicolai M. Participants will gain: An understanding of the architecture behind the STL, including its core components and concepts. Mastery of the subtle differences in semantics of member and non-member functions with the same name, e.g., find, remove, etc. Knowledge of how to integrate STL containers with code expecting arrays and other C-like data structures. The ability to cope with the complex STL-related error messages compilers often generate. Format: Lectures and programming labs. Exercises Further Reading
    DevelopMentor Courses - Tuesday, March 1, 2011
  • Understanding Map - Reduce
    14: public string Book { get; set; }. Each order line contains the books title, the quantity and the amount it was sold for. In this case the books title and the price it was sold for. 3: public string Book { get; set; }. 11: Book = line.Book, 12: Amount = line.Price. 7: Book = line.Book, 8: Amount = line.Price. 7: Book = grp.Key, 8: Amount = grp.Sum(item => item.Amount). Quite a few people seem to be intimidated by the concept of Map-Reduce. Basic principle The basic Map-Reduce consists of two steps. Simple right? Again pretty simple right?
    The Problem Solver - Monday, December 3, 2012
  • Maurice de Beijer: Integrating the #WebAPI HttpClient and ApiController in a single test
    Testing the getting of books The code used to test getting the books from the ApiController is actually quite similar to testing just the client code. In this case it uses an in memory repository so I know exactly that the same set of 5 books are returned every time. 11: var books = client.GetBooks(); 12: 13: // Assert. The test of adding a new book. Adding a new book in an integration test is just as simple: 1: [TestMethod]. 13: var response = client.PostBook(book); 14: 15: // Assert. 17: client.PutBook(book); 18: 19: // Assert. Sweet
    The Problem Solver - Monday, May 27, 2013
  • Screening C# Candidates: Let’s Play 20 Questions!
    If a person has ever bothered to read a book or technical article or taken a training course, their answers will set them apart from the crowd of folks who don’t make time for ongoing professional development. My short list for the books on various.NET API’s is Programming Entity Framework by Julie Lerman , Programming WCF Services by Juval Lowy , Essential WPF by Chris Anderson , Silverlight 4 in Action by Pete Brown , and Pro ASP.NET MVC by Steve Sanderson. Furthermore, I’m looking for a developer with a thirst for knowledge. This is the purpose of the technical phone screen.
    DevelopMentor Courses - Tuesday, February 28, 2012
  • 10 Things to make you Agile adoption successfull
    And I fluffed it, despite having written a book on the subject I didn’t have a quick answer to hand. You can read the books, you can experiment, you can go on courses. Reading books works for some people but most books go unread, or the words go in one eye and out the other. One of the closing slides in my Agile Foundations course includes a quote from Ken Schwaber saying that only 30% of teams who attempt Scrum will be successful. What I find interesting about this quote is that it aligns with many other change management studies. There are real feedback loops here.
    Allan Kelly's Blog - Monday, May 14, 2012
  • Getting started with RavenDB in an ASP.NET MVC application
    In this demo I am going to use a simple book application to show how simple it is to get started with RavenDB. The book class is pretty basic and looks like this; 1: namespace RavenMvc.Models. 3: public class Book. list of books application. Showing a lost of books is real simple. 4: // GET: /Books/. 9: var books = session.Query ().ToList(); ToList(); 10: return View(books); 11: }. Instead RavenDB will just check to see of it knows about books and if so return them. Loading a single book. 2: // GET: /Books/Details/5.
    The Problem Solver - Sunday, November 25, 2012
  • Programmers without TDD will be unemployable by 2022 (a prediction)
    This is unlike Agile in general where it is very difficult to tell who actually understand it and who has just read a book or two.) 'New year is traditionally the time of predictions, and several of the blogs I read have been engaging in predictions (e.g. Ian Sommerville “Software Engineerng looking forward 20 years.” ). This is not a tradition I usually engage in myself but for once I’d like to make one. I’ll get back to software economics next time, I need to make some conclusions.) By TDD I mean Test Driven Development - also called Test First (or Design Driven) Development.
    Allan Kelly's Blog - Tuesday, January 7, 2014
  • #AOSW - Agile Outside of Software - starts here
    After the conference I discovered this small book which I’ve only just started reading: “ Scrum Marketing: Applying Agile Methodologies to Marketing ”.) 'We had the Agile on the Beach conference a couple of weeks. In a word: Brilliant - just look at the photos and see how people enjoyed themselves. OK, I’m biased, I’m one of the organisers, but many people told me it was brilliant or they just didn’t want to hurt my feelings. There is much I could write about Agile on the Beach but I don’t have enough time. Her talk is available on YouTube. Oxford Innovation have built on that legacy.
    Allan Kelly's Blog - Tuesday, September 23, 2014
  • Maurice de Beijer: Querying RavenDB databases
    In my original online example you might have noticed that the books aren't ordered. 5: var books = session.Query (). 7: ToList(); 8: 9: return View(books); 10: }. 5: var books = from book in session.Query (). 7: select book; 8: 9: return View(books.ToList()); 10: }. Just want books from an author starting with “A”? The following view search for books where the title or author starts with the passed string. 5: var books = session.Query (). 8: ToList(); 9: 10: return View( "Index" , books); 11: }. 11: }. 11: }.
    The Problem Solver - Monday, December 17, 2012
  • Allan Kelly: Nightmare on Agile Street
    points are the new hours, in the dream I have a book “The Mythical Man Point”. 'I’m awake. m lying in my bed. m sweating but I’m cold. Its the small hours of the morning and the dream is as vivid as it is horrid. m standing in a clients offices, I’ve been here before, I know whats happening. They are building an website. Quite a complex one, this will be the primary purchasing venue for many customers. This will project the company image - and with the right bits it can up-sell to customers - it can even help reduce costs by servicing the customers after the sale. All good stuff.
    Allan Kelly's Blog - Monday, July 28, 2014
  • RavenDB and multiple databases
    In my previous two posts about RavenDB I used a Book class as the example. The first example was an ASP.NET MVC 3 application and the second was an ASP.NET MVC 4 application and I just copies the Books class from the first to the second example. The extra information is stored as metadata along with the book data but only the actual class name, Book in this case, is used as the type discriminator. The screenshot below shows the metadata of one of the books I created using the original MVC3 application. And I could edit and save them without any problems.
    The Problem Solver - Tuesday, November 27, 2012
  • 10 years on: IT does matter, more than ever
    remember booking my first flight to the US that year. We talked, she booked me a flight. This year I’ve booked flights on BA, KLM, S7 and Virgin Atlantic. How I book them - the company web site, Opodo, Expedia, SkyScanner has a lot to do with the customer service experience. normal start a flight search on SkyScanner, switch to Opodo or Expedia to book and complete things on the airlines own site. Booking the family holiday is even more IT dependent. At the time my response was, “Is IT worth it?” It was a strategy decision. Anyway, 10 years on.
    Allan Kelly's Blog - Thursday, July 19, 2012
  • Agile: Where's the evidence?
    For their book Organizational Patterns of Agile Software Development Coplien and Harrison spent over 10 years assessing teams. A few weeks ago I was presenting at the BCS SIGIST conference - another outing for my popular Objective Agility presentation. Someone in the audience asked: “Where is the evidence that Agile works?” My response was in two parts. First although it sounds like a reasonable question I’ve come to believe that this is a question that is asked by those who don’t believe in Agile, those who want to stall thing. It is rarely a question aimed at a rational decision.
    Allan Kelly's Blog - Friday, March 30, 2012
  • Estimates or #NoEstimates? that is the question
    ve blogged about this before (well, I’ve mentioned it in lots of blogs, see this one Conclusions and Hypothesis about estimates ) and I’ve devoted a large section of the Xanpan book to talking about I see estimates working but I think its worth revisiting the subject. 'To estimate or not to estimate, to join the #NoEstimates bang-wagon or not, that is the question. Maybe it is a navel gazing exercise for agile-folk but it does seem to be the reoccurring theme. And I can’t get over this feeling that some of my peers think I’m a bit stupid for continuing to support estimates.
    Allan Kelly's Blog - Monday, September 29, 2014
  • Business Patterns for Software Developers
    OK, I admit it, I was there to plug my book Business Patterns for Software Developers - sales are going well, although I can always do with more and a few more reviews on Amazon would be well received. One of these questions concerned the book’s title: Business Patterns for Software Developers. Second, when I was writing the book I tried to imagine the reader. Who was going to read this book? And yes, I imagined specific individuals reading this book. Anyway, I digress…. There must have been 30 or so people there and the presentation was well received.
    Allan Kelly's Blog - Friday, June 8, 2012
  • The Prototype of Future Knowledge Workers
    'The following is an except from my 2008 book “Changing Software Development: Learning to be Agile”. Hence I thought now would be a good time to share this, it also means I can reference this post in the one that comes next… and who know, I might even rustle up a few sales for the book! ve been thinking about this suggestion a lot recently and have a blog post in the works. The Prototype of Future Knowledge Workers Highlighting IT workers as knowledge workers allows us to learn from the existing body of knowledge on the subject. If a tool doesn’t exist, they can’t use it.
    Allan Kelly's Blog - Monday, April 7, 2014
  • 10 pieces of advice for teams
    First I’ve realised that I have an awful lot I would like to say about it, I’m terrified it will become another book. I have started to write up a more useful description of Xanpan. In doing so two things have happened. Second, I’m becoming more and more aware of how Xanpan differs from Scrum, XP and Kanban. As a result I expect this blog will get a little quieter. But before the end of the year I’d like to get a few entries finished and published which have been languishing for a while. Of course, if you are a self-managing team you should all read this list.
    Allan Kelly's Blog - Thursday, November 22, 2012
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